Not right now.
For e-commerce sites, both on the web and mobile, there’s a lot you can control about your site, for instance, what products are featured, site promotions, the shopping cart and more. But when it comes to site performance, some issues are out of the retailer’s hands.

For example, last month Toolfetch.com’s mobile commerce site experienced availability issues. While load time remained a quick 5.30 seconds, the site was unavailable for nearly 10% of customers who tried to load it. The culprit? Service interruption at the data center. 

Toolfetch.com had likely created a multi-homed network connecting their data center to two independent carriers – it’s like running Comcast and RCN for your home Internet connection and using them both at the same time. Many e-commerce sites conduct such practices, and it’s almost required to ensure adequate uptime these days. Running this type of connection adds complexity and multiple additional layers that must be monitored and managed properly. From our perspective here at Blueport, running this multi-homed network alone isn’t enough to guarantee better performance and uptime.

In addition to implementing a multi-homed network with independent carriers, we also use edge caching via Akamai for all of our clients’ e-commerce sites.  Akamai copies our websites and stores the pages across thousands of nodes all over the US and Canada. When a user hits one of our clients’ websites, 85% of the time the data they see is loaded via a node located geographically close to the user’s computer.  If Akamai does not have already have a copy of the page, the service determines the fastest path to loading the page for the user and fetches the information from our data center to display it as quickly as possible.

By taking additional precautions, we are able to further reduce the risk of the unexpected and improve site performance for our clients.

Related posts:Copyright 2010, Official Blog of Blueport Commerce

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